Earlier this year, Bark & Co (the company behind BarkBox and BarkShop started using Zendesk Message to manage their conversations from Facebook Messenger. BarkBox’s average response times decreased dramatically—from 60 minutes to 4 minutes—even as the number of conversations doubled. Today, the company is extending their support offering to Twitter Direct Messages to reach an even bigger audience with a unique and compelling experience.
Like several corporate replies to others' reviews, I also have been informed by corporate that a "hiccup in the warehouse" is delaying August orders. Zero information was provided by the company up front to explain this problem. I attempted a chat with customer service last week only to discover that there is no chat. I had to leave a message, which wasn't returned. Then I emailed customer service about an ETA. That prompted a corporate reply with the as-now-standard "hiccup in the warehouse" explanation. I was told our August box is "still on the way." That doesn't answer my ETA question.
The KONG Extreme Dog Toy is more than just a chew toy — it is also an interactive toy. Stuff this toy with your dog's favorite treats, and he'll be happy for hours, tossing the toy around and working to get at the treats inside. The unpredictable bouncing action makes the KONG Extreme a great toy for games of fetch, and it is also the perfect toy to keep your dog busy when he's confined to his crate or left home alone. It is also a great option for dogs with separation anxiety.
By focusing on a specific task —such as repeatedly returning a ball, Kong, or Frisbee® or playing "hide-and-seek" with treats or toys — your dog can expend pent-up mental and physical energy from boredom in a limited amount of time and space. For young, high-energy and untrained dogs, interactive play also offers an opportunity for socialization and helps them learn about appropriate and inappropriate behavior, such as jumping up or being mouthy.
My dog, Cooper, has been getting boxes each month for over a year now. He started when he was four months old and the company has been helpful making sure his box is the best for his age and chewing stage. We have never been disappointed in the contents of a box. We just added a new puppy to the family and have already ordered her Bark Box. Now, both dogs will love going to the post office to get "their" mail.
I've always wanted to try a subscription for my pups but I'm a bit ashamed that this was my first experience. BarkBox was good but had major hits and misses. I have giant, playful, strong dogs and though this was indicated, I don't feel as though any size consideration is evaluated when selecting toys for the boxes. I do like that they always came with two toys because it meant each dog had 15 minutes of play time before I had to wrestle their jaws open to dig out the stuffing and bits of squeakers they were about to ingest. The treats have been great! They especially loved the apple cider treats that started to ferment when left in a cookie jar and made all their other treats reek of beer. As a consumer that willingly signed up for the box and entered my debit card information freely, I should have read more in-depth. I did not know that when you terminate your subscription that you will continue to be charged until you reach the year mark of signing up. For me it meant 9 more months of money that was to be taken out of my account had I not caught it. I like true month to month boxes where a cancellation is immediate and I wish they had made their rather off-kilter ways of charging and processing more visible. I can think of some major changes that they could make but ultimately some of the blame rests on me for not reading better. I know my pups will be sad as they've grown accustomed to their box but I can buy more durable and healthy big dog treats for just a little more money and I know it would be more worth it.

Emmy likes: You have the the option to choose a treats and toys *or* a treats-only or toys-only box, which is very cool — and can specify whether you'd like the treats to be all-natural, organic, grain-free, or protein-sensitive. You can also choose how frequently you'd like to be sent the box (monthly, bimonthly, or quarterly) and how many items you'd like to be in the box; the "uno" comes with four to five items, and the "grande" with five to seven. The power chewer option is only $7 more than a regular box, which makes it an incredible deal, overall.


My Lab/whippet mixed pup Nora (45 pounds, 8 years) rarely cares for any kind of traditional dog toy. She’s intimidated by toys that squeak, and toys that hit the floor with a loud thud. She doesn’t play fetch unless other dogs are around. However, she does take to treats meant for chewing. After trying bully sticks (hurt her gums), antlers (made a terrible sound against her teeth), and others, I came across the Himalayan Dog Chew: a softer chew made from yak and cow milk. It’s still tough enough that it lasts her a few days of on and off chewing but soft enough that I’m not worried it’ll hurt her mouth. Once the chew reaches the last nubbin—which you don’t want your dog to swallow whole—you can briefly pop it into the microwave to soften it into a cheesy treat.
When we went to meet (and ultimately take home) our rescue mini-schnauzer mix Reggie a year and a half ago, we took four things with us: a collar and leash, a small plush hedgehog, and this weblike rubber ball. The plush hedgehog is now a flat hedgehog — like most dogs, Reggie takes great pride in disemboweling his stuffed toys — and the leash and collar are a little worse for wear, but the Hol-ee Roller rubber ball is still going strong. In fact, it looks pretty much new.
Subscriptions seem to be on autorenew. Right now, I pay for a year at a time. I can't remember if there is an option to pay for a month at a time or not. I am thinking not. Subscribers set up an account and from there, you can cancel if you desire. That option appears to be easy to figure out and not hidden like some autoship companies. The one thing I did not like is not getting a notification of when it was time for my yearly subscription rate being charged to my credit card. It's possible there was an e-mail but if there was, I didn't see it. I realize it is my responsibility to keep track of that. I do not know if it is possible to cancel mid-subscription if, heaven forbid, something would happen to my dog. I have to think it's possible as getting a new BarkBox could be painful shortly after losing a pet.
Made in the USA. Many of these subscription boxes for dogs source their treats (and sometimes toys as well) from the USA. Some source them from the USA and other areas, but promise that nothing comes from China. We tried to make note of sourcing information in this guide, but if this is important to you (and it probably should be – especially when it comes to treats), make sure to check the box’s website for the full details on where products are sourced from.
Not only does the StarMark Bob-A-Lot dispense treats, but the weighted anti-slip bottom makes the toy wiggle and wobble, engaging your dog's senses and enticing him to play. Made from durable plastic and easy to clean, this toy is a top choice for dogs and dog owners alike. Simply fill it with treats then set it on the floor — a nudge is all it takes to make the toy wobble and your dog will be hooked immediately.
But the data also shows a wide range. The lower bound is under $15, while the upper bound is over $35. This means there is scope for BarkBox to “complicate” their pricing. Consumer products try and keep pricing simple to reduce the friction in the sign-up. This often leads to them leaving money on the table. Here, BarkBox has options at both the premium level and the lower priced level:
The study suggests that the craziest dog people might go into withdrawal when they are away from their dog and lean on technology for quick fixes. Many dog people admit they have watched their dog on a webcam (17%) or Skyped or FaceTimed with them while they were away (14%). “This is especially true of Millennials, who are more likely than non-Millennials (24% vs. 13%) to watch their dog on a webcam. In fact, Millennials are nearly three times as likely as their older counterparts (23% vs. 8%) to Skype or FaceTime their dog.”
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